Friday, 4 May 2018

Top Ten Books I Loved But Will Never Re-read

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish, and now lives at That Artsy Reader Girl. As usual, these are not in any particular order.


Edit: made a whoopsy and messed up the scheduling so have this post really late!

1 - Broken Harbour by Tana French - read for university, I think this is one of those 'it's not the same when you know what's going to happen' sort of stories.

2 - Like Other Girls by Claire Hennessy - a great book, a fantastic story but one of those subjects that, of course, deserves more attention but makes it difficult to read about

3 - The Island at the End of Everything by Karen Millwood Hargrave - maybe a little young for me but still a moving story and one I will happily recommend, just not re-read.

4 - I Capture The Castle by Dodie Smith - a classic growing-up story but a little dated, obviously. Loved it, glad I read it, but don't need to read again.

5 - The Lost and the Found by Cat Clarke - as with most of Clarke's books, they hit you hard, right in the feels, and although amazing I'm not sure I can go through that again!

6 - Never Evers by Tom Ellen and Lucy Ivison - I adore their books, would quite happily re-read Freshers again and again, but this one was a little young for me.

7 - We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson - loved it but think this is another 'can only read it once' kind of books.

8 - Severed Heads, Broken Hearts by Robyn Scheider - although I love a good contemporary, they do tend to follow the same lines and I don't really feel the need to pick this up again.

9 - All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven - similar to Cat Clarke, this was a stunning story but with a gut-wrenching ending that I'm not sure I could handle again.

10 - The Perfectionists by Sara Shepard - this is becoming a thing with crime stories, apparently: it's not the same, reading them when you know what's going to happen but this duology was great fun.

Tuesday, 1 May 2018

Books I'd Slay A Lion to Get Early (But Not Really Because Animals are Precious)

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish and now lives at That Artsy Reader Girl.


Kinda struggled with this one because my studying means I've lost touch a little with the book world and also literally cannot afford to get excited about new books!


1 - How Do You Like Me Now? by Holly Bourne - due 14th June - will happily devour anything and everything written by this woman.


2 - The Surface Breaks by Louise O'Neill - due 3rd May - ok, so I really don't have very much longer to wait for this one but chances are I'm not going to be able to read it for months anyway.


3 - When the Curtain Falls by Carrie Hope Fletcher - due 12th July - I adore Carrie's videos and her writing style, and this one, about ghosts in a theatre, is right up my alley!


4 - Floored by Sara Barnard, etc. - due 12th July - a collaborative novel with all of my favourite authors? Yes please!


5 - Listen to Your Heart by Kasie West - due 29th May - I love Kasie West, her books are the epitome of a good summer rom-com and her latest sounds great.


6 - I Was Born For This by Alice Oseman - due 3rd May - not long now!


And that's about it! Like I said, so out of touch with new and upcoming releases so if there's something I missed that you think I should have my eye on, please let me know!

Tuesday, 3 April 2018

Characters that Made the Book (Less Awful)

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish and now lives at That Artsy Reader Girl. I think I probably need a little disclaimer here: none of these books were actually bad, they are just way down on my favourites list. And as per usual, this is not in any particular order.

1 - Ash from The Fandom by Anna Day - in the "original" Gallows Dance, Ash is the puppy-love character, the cute-ish boy in the background but not the main love interest. But when Violet and her friends highjack the story, Ash comes front and centre and really shines.

2 - Abel from Defy The Stars by Claudia Gray - technically a robot, Abel has more humanity in him than most of the humans do in this space war. 

3 - Cath from Heartless by Marissa Meyer - from what I can remember, Cath was a fairly two-dimensional character, but she did love to bake and that's the kind of person I can support!

4 - Asher from The Fixer by Jennifer Lynn Barnes - the comic relief with a sharp mind in this political drama for teenagers was just incredibly funny and a welcome change from all the seriousness. 

5 - Arin from The Winner's Cuse by Marie Rutkoski - even though I didn't ship his relationship with Kestral, he was still a really interesting character in a really interesting and well-set up world.

An extra, because I can:
Tric from Nevernight by Jay Kristoff - definitely a favourite book of mine, and of course Mia is equally incredible but Tric completely stole my heart!

Second disclaimer: I know it's supposed to be ten and I've technically done 6 - let's just go with it because I am tired and it's honestly been a really shitty week and I couldn't think beyond these 5/6. 

Tuesday, 20 March 2018

Top Books on my Spring TBR

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish and now lives at That Artsy Reader Girl.




I've already talked about my March TBR, to be found here if you're interested, but as I am off for two weeks at Easter as well as going on a study trip to Poland and Germany, I'm going to get a lot of reading done - and not all of it set texts!


University
1 - The Third Man by Graham Greene
2 - Wormwood by Poppy Z Brite
3 - And the Ass Saw the Angel by Nick Cave


Pleasure
4 - Obsidio by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff
5 - Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman
6 - Scythe by Neal Shusterman
7 - The Exact Opposite of Okay by Laura Steven
8 - Sam and Ilsa's Last Hurrah by Rachel Cohn and Daivd Levithan
9 - Moxie by Jennifer Mathieu
10 - Genuine Fraud by E Lockhart




Obviously if I can get ahead of my university reading then I will prioritise that but while I have time off, I'm going to catch up on my TBR. Plus I'm only taking my kindle on my trip so can finally catch up on the e-books I've been collecting for months!


Let me know what's on your Spring-time TBR or if there's any books you're waiting for!

Friday, 2 March 2018

March TBR

To make up for a ridiculous absence, here is my very boring TBR for the month of March which is, of course, all university books because I don't have room in my head or my life for anything else!


Currently Reading: Zombie Apocalypse! by Stephen Jones


To read and be studied in March:
The Devil Rides Out by Dennis Wheatley
Fat White Vampire Blues by Andrew Fox
Pig Island by Mo Hayder
Rosanna by Maj Sjowall and Per Wahloo
The Buenos Aires Quintet by Manuel Vazquez Montalban


It might not look like a lot for one month - normally, five books in one month is easy for me - but because of the content and the writing styles, it takes a lot more of my brain power to concentrate and way more will power to pick them up in the first place!


Anyway, if you're interested, I'm reading The Devil Rides Out and comparing it to the film of the same title; Vampire Blues and Pig Island we will be looking at the deviant body; and the last two are for Latin-American crime. Oh, and my current read and my last read, World War Z, is for the Gothic body of zombies and apocalyptic fictions. I do love my course, even though the amount of reading is stressing me out at the moment.

Tuesday, 27 February 2018

Books I Could Re-read Forever and Ever

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish, and now lives at That Artsy Reader Girl.


In no particular order, here is a list of ten books or series that I could quite happily re-read and never get bored. In fact, most of them I have read a few times already!
Halfway to the Grave (Night Huntress, #1)
1 - Halfway to the Grave by Jeaniene Frost - this is one I always reach for in times of turmoil or upset. It always makes me happy and laugh and I especially enjoy remembering how Cat and Bones' relationship started.

2 - Harry Potter by JK Rowling - this might be an easy one and maybe a cop-out but I've recently re-read the entire series, this time on audio-book with the amazing Stephen Fry, and not only did I forget a lot of little details, I fell completely in love with the series again.

3 - Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell - read twice since publication, I still hold the belief that it is a perfect story of growing up and leaving home.

4 - Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins - another one I've read twice since publication, this story just makes me gooey and happy.
The Diamond of Drury Lane (Cat Royal, #1)
5 - The Diamond of Drury Lane by Julia Golding - the Cat Royal series was my favourite thing ever when I was younger and Cat is just the best young heroine I could have hoped for when I was an unsure pre-teen.

6 - The Host by Stephanie Meyer - goodness, another one I've read twice since publication! At least! Whenever I pick it up, I skip the first few chapters and start from when Wanderer finds the caves; the slow burn of the growing relationship with Ian makes me happy and the surprisingly clever critique of what makes us human makes me think.

7 - The End of the World as We Know It by Iva-Marie Palmer - read all the way back in 2014, I can remember loving this for its originality and its humour, and would love to re-read it with my developed critical hat on.

8 - Unsticky by Sarra Manning - one of my favourite of Sarra's adult contemporaries, I re-read this for the romance and the sex scene, to be honest. Grace and Vaughn is one of my favourite couples to read because of the banter (same with Cat and Bones, come to think of it!).
The Screaming Staircase (Lockwood & Co., #1)
9 - The Screaming Staircase by Jonathan Stroud - along with the rest of the series, I would love to read them back to back, as I read them too far apart as the later books were being published. Lockwood is my hero and I would quite happily just read about him and his crew of ghost-hunters forever.

10 - The Mediator series by Meg Cabot - another of my favourite series from pre-teen and teenage years, I have read the whole series through twice and could easily do it again and again because Suze is incredible and witty, and Jesse is another hero worthy of the page-time.

Friday, 9 February 2018

Love, Hate and Other Filters by Samira Ahmed

Love, Hate & Other FiltersFirst love, first heartbreak, first brush with prejudice . . .
A romantic, searing and relevant debut about Islamophobia and how it affects the normal life of a teenage girl.

"I don't want something . . . expected. I want to go to film school and be the first Indian American to win an Oscar, and then I can meet the One and fall in big, heart-bursting love, and we'll travel the world, my camera ready to capture our adventures." My cheeks flush; I know I'm blushing, but I can't bring myself to shut up. "Oh, my God. I want my future life to be a cheesy romantic comedy."
He shakes his head. "No," he says. "You want it to be an epic."

Maya Aziz dreams of being a film maker in New York. Her family have other ideas. They want her to be a dutiful daughter who wears gold jewellery and high heels and trains to be a doctor. But jewellery and heels are so uncomfortable...

She's also caught between the guy she SHOULD like and the guy she DOES like. But she doesn't want to let Kareem down and things with Phil would never work out anyway. Would they?

Then a suicide bomber who shares her last name strikes in a city hundreds of miles away and everything changes . . .
  


I have mixed feelings about this book. I really wanted to like it, just based on its completely original premise and diverse representation of Muslim teens living in this permanently fearful environment in their own homes. Yet, the whole premise the impact a suicide bomber has on her life wasn't as big a plot-point as I expected. It was done really well, I think, just in the way it explored how these big global political actions can affect individual families, but I kind of wanted more.


Maya was interesting - I adored her ambition to be a film maker, it's completely original and adorable, and her independent attitude was spot-on for most teenagers. But she was super rude to her parents. I get that they came from different places, not only the generational gap but also the literal place of America versus India in terms of teenage rebellion, independence and dating expectations, but Maya was pretty flippant with them, didn't even really attempt to understand where they were coming from or try to converse and compromise. She mostly came across as very superficial, in her taste in boys and her apparent disregard for her religion and disrespect for her parents. I wanted to like her, and I definitely felt for her when the bullying got bad, but she was mostly kinda annoying.


There wasn't as much on the Muslim part of her life as I'd expected - there was one joke about eating pork, and maybe a couple of mentions of praying with her parents but apart from that - diddly squat! There was a lot on the Indian part of her upbringing, which I adored learning about.


I also didn't entirely believe in the romance - Maya was obviously infatuated but based on nothing other than his pretty face and we learn very little about Phil, well some stuff about his family and it was all so typically Mid-west/small town that... meh. Phil also made a pretty big whoopsie just after the bomber attack, not really sure whether he was supposed to support or ignore Maya - I mean, really?


Wow, turns out I had way more to say than I thought! All in all, definitely a book to try for yourself - there was parts I loved and felt so happy they were included, especially in a YA novel, but there were parts I didn't understand the point of, or even wanted more from. An author to watch and definitely a topic more books could do with tackling.


Published 16th January 2018 by Hot Key Books. Thank you to the publisher and Netgalley for my copy in exchange for an honest review.